Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 50

Thread: *SPOILERS* Ender's Game Discussion For Those Who've Finished The Book

  1. #1
    GWC Crüe Chuck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Gamertag
    Smeghead
    Twitter
    GWCChuck
    Posts
    2,873

    Default *SPOILERS* Ender's Game Discussion For Those Who've Finished The Book

    As DocP Pointed out over in the standard Ender's Game discussion, we need a place for people to discuss the book AFTER they've finished it. Any of you reading this thread will know why. So here 'tis.

  2. #2
    Alpaca tanstaafl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Gamertag
    CavemanGamer
    Twitter
    tanstaaflWDM
    Posts
    885

    Default

    I know I linked to this before, but no discussion of Ender's Game would be complete without this xkcd comic. (As with all xkcd strips, be sure to check the alt text in the image too.)

    XBL- CavemanGamer | Steam- tanstaaflWDM | Twitter- tanstaaflWDM | Blog- 14kofginafpd


  3. #3
    Alpaca DocP's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    BEHIND YOU!
    Gamertag
    Setsunaandkurai
    Posts
    269

    Default

    Yeah, this is a much better idea than I had.


    "In my defense, that was physically impossible"

  4. #4
    Alpaca transform57's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Cambridge UK
    Gamertag
    transform577
    Posts
    28

    Default

    It's funny we chose this book because I just read it about two month ago, great minds think alike I guess Great book... great ending. I had a clue how it was going to end but was still surprised. I picked up the sequel right after reading it but just couldn't get into it half as much as the first. Anyone else have the same problem?

  5. #5
    Alpaca Locke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    California
    Posts
    176

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by transform57 View Post
    It's funny we chose this book because I just read it about two month ago, great minds think alike I guess Great book... great ending. I had a clue how it was going to end but was still surprised. I picked up the sequel right after reading it but just couldn't get into it half as much as the first. Anyone else have the same problem?
    Yeah I'm right there with you... I ended up reading a couple of the following books, but I never really got into them and they definately didn't stick, all I can remember is a few vague plot points.

    However if you haven't already, I'd recommend giving Ender's Shadow a read. It's Ender's Game told from Bean's perspective. Provides some insight into his character and some interesting background information, I enjoyed that one alot, albeit not quite so much as the original.

    concerning the book, Valentine rocks, as does Jailor Rackman, although not quite as much as his nickname =)

    Loved the story and the twist at the end. Even more so, I loved the characters

    By the way, I have a question. I see that people often mention that they saw an ending coming or some such thing concerning stories(in all formats) with a twist at the end or a mystery sustained throughout. However when I watch or read a story such as Ender's Game, I don't like to try and predict things, I instead enjoy simply going along with the story wherever it may take me. Am I the only one? And also, for those of you who do figure out twists or mysteries before they happen in the story, do you consciously dwell on it and try to figure it out? or do you just sort of realise where its going without trying
    Baltar is my hero

  6. #6
    Alpaca kirsten's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Twitter
    dukiekirsten3
    Posts
    134

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Locke View Post
    By the way, I have a question. I see that people often mention that they saw an ending coming or some such thing concerning stories(in all formats) with a twist at the end or a mystery sustained throughout. However when I watch or read a story such as Ender's Game, I don't like to try and predict things, I instead enjoy simply going along with the story wherever it may take me. Am I the only one? And also, for those of you who do figure out twists or mysteries before they happen in the story, do you consciously dwell on it and try to figure it out? or do you just sort of realise where its going without trying
    For me, I don't try to guess the ending/twist. The only thing that I did seem to get hung up on was the game with the Giant...the whole time reading the book up until the "final exam" I assumed that this is what "Ender's Game" referred to... post exam, I assumed the other way around. When Card brought it back at the end though, I felt that it was a nice touch and a relatively good twist.

    Back to your original question though, I try not to guess the twist. I definitely try to enjoy the story as the author would have it...otherwise it seems like I would be harming the integrity of the story/place myself above the author. Does this sound weird, or does someone else see it that way? Kinda like a book as artwork type argument, I realize, but that's how I try to read books.

  7. #7
    Alpaca Tesseract's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Lower Antipolo, Philippines
    Posts
    355

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Locke View Post
    Yeah I'm right there with you... I ended up reading a couple of the following books, but I never really got into them and they definately didn't stick, all I can remember is a few vague plot points.
    I felt the same. I bought the Ender's sequel immediately after I finished the book and I quite couldn't get into the story. At the end of Ender's Game, Ender was a totally devastated young man (teenager?) and he went off to other planets to.. preach the galactic gospel-? The story was much more introspective and philosophical than the actual sci-fi that Ender's Game was.

    However if you haven't already, I'd recommend giving Ender's Shadow a read. It's Ender's Game told from Bean's perspective. Provides some insight into his character and some interesting background information, I enjoyed that one alot, albeit not quite so much as the original.
    I guess the Shadow series was much easier for me to follow because the story stayed on Earth. Card stuck with characters who were very much human, with real problems in a futuristic setting.

    Now, back to the book itself:

    The Wiggin kids! Wow. Family of geniuses with diametrically different personalities: sadistic Peter, empathic Valentine, and Ender somewhere in the middle of both. I wonder if Card meant that by putting Ender as the 'middle ground' between Val and Peter's tendencies, he wanted to illustrate the perfect military leader-? A person who feels utmost compassion but can be cold and calculating at the same time in times of conflict?

    And what does it say that Ender, having won the war, becomes so destroyed by remorse that he exiles himself from mankind? He was removed from his family as a kid that he has no one to come back to when it was done. Even if his parents were still alive, he chose to go with Valentine to space.

    The kid-genius academy storyline isn't really anything new. What I liked about Ender's Game was that instead of the cutesy special kids prep-school storyline (how many versions of wizard-school, master's apprentice, super-secret genius agency, DNA-replication story have I read?) is that it was military training (well at least it was a first for me). For kids. Gradeschoolers with exceptional military strategy skills set in the future. How do you reconcile that? Soldiers are trained to do battle and, if necessary, kill.

    The 'guilt' is less since the enemy isn't human. That's what we like to think so it's "easier" to shoot them up. So if we were faced with a similar situation now, will the human race just rejoice-? Was Ender's reaction (to leave) too extreme? In the BSG universe, if the Colonials were successful in wiping out the Cylons (the re-imagined universe has both the robot and humanoid versions) a second time around, the writers will have this same scenario. Will the Colonials have a collective guilt over winning against an alien race, or will humans just plain rejoice over the survival of their race?

    On the first Cylon War, the Colonials just moved on (the humans almost having been wiped out). The only real change that happened after the toaster-Cylons were the yearly armistice meetings and a very healthy fear of the robots coming back.

    The idea of the story was great. The battle action was fantastic. But aside from the setting, the technical stuff, what makes the book so open to discussion are the conflicts. Soldier Kids, Child abandonment, kids being forced to grow up too fast out of necessity.

    Whew! Sorry for the long post - I've never met anyone else who's read the book and I was excited that the book won as this month's read.

  8. #8
    Alpaca Joe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Boston, Ma
    Posts
    28

    Default

    The 'guilt' is less since the enemy isn't human. That's what we like to think so it's "easier" to shoot them up. So if we were faced with a similar situation now, will the human race just rejoice-? Was Ender's reaction (to leave) too extreme?
    It was definitely Ender's time to leave. His guilt was too great and he needed purpose. Had he stayed on Earth, he would have been in danger of being kidnapped and used for war purposes. It was best for him to leave. What more could anyone accomplish after saving the world? People who accomplish great things are meant for bigger destinies.

    What I appreciated most about this storyline was Ender's love and appreciation for all forms of life. He faced down guilt throughout the story. It was one of the biggest themes in the book, and it continues to be in the following books.

    I've read all the books in the Ender series. Both Bean's storyline and Ender's storyline. My favorite character, aside from Ender and Bean is Jane. Jane is pure scifi. She's hardcore and fulfills every teenage boys dream of finding a fembot girlfriend.
    Simply and observer of human nature.

    "Do you know how many times I've had to repair that ship?"

  9. #9

    Default

    Since we are on the topic of Ender, I highly recommend the book: First Meetings in Ender's Universe
    http://www.amazon.com/First-Meetings...5055137&sr=8-1

    It is a collection of short stories that deal with when the major characters meet across all the Ender books. The book is written more for the teen/adolescent level, but it is still a good read for any Ender fan.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tesseract View Post
    The idea of the story was great. The battle action was fantastic. But aside from the setting, the technical stuff, what makes the book so open to discussion are the conflicts. Soldier Kids, Child abandonment, kids being forced to grow up too fast out of necessity.
    I kind of wished the book had dealt a little more with what it means/does to a kid to be forced to grow up like that. It kind of does with how the whole experience crushes Ender in the end, but what about all the other kids who didn't make it or the other teachers who are forced to basically torture these kids.
    None of the teachers really seems all that torn with the fact that they have to torture these kids to save mankind. Its just presented as some abstract talking point, but never really explored.

    That being said, I do like how Ender keeps his childlike challenge of authority all the way through. He decides to beat the game not because he is told to, but because he knows his finding ways to win will piss off the commander (especially the trick with the frozen kids helmets triggering the door/win, that was great).
    The instructors turn his challenge of authority around on itself by making him feel his only way out is to beat them. He keeps going not because he is supposed to, but because he doesn't want them to win (even though he doesn't realize who the "them" is).

    I think I'd enjoy a book written from the teacher's/commander's view. What it is like to try and outsmart the smartest kids in the world and then try to turn them into the tools they have to be without letting them really know what they are doing. Ender's Game kind of glosses over this a bit too much.

Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •