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Number 13
October 25th, 2007, 12:03 AM
Okay, today in my American history class my professor was talking about Frederick Douglass. Now for years I have thought that this man resembles a lion. I guess it's the wild hair mane going on. So strangely enough after all these years, thinking I'm the only one, she mentions that he reminds her of a lion. I'm in a class of about 60-70 students and it was all I could do to keep my self from bursting out laughing in the middle of a discussion about slavery. It was just a weird moment in time. I did a little research and it looks like back in the day, he was referred to as "The Lion of Anacostia," so I guess we weren't the only ones. Anyway, does anyone else see what I see?
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/1c/Frederick_Douglass_portrait.jpg/250px-Frederick_Douglass_portrait.jpg

Amazing man, though. The day he died he was giving a speech for women's rights and his second (and final) wife was a white lady, which is pretty fascinating to me considering the times they lived in and they apparently were practically rejected by their families because of it. I've gotta check out his book since I'm absolutely blown away by his, for a lack of a better term, cojones.

Nickname Boomer
October 25th, 2007, 01:42 AM
So I looked him up and he was publisher, of some paper’s with the motto of

Right is of no Sex — Truth is of no Color — God is the Father of us all, and we are all brethren


seems like quite a man to me

Audra
October 26th, 2007, 03:30 PM
Yes, you should definitely check out his most famous work, "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave."

He was born into slavery in Maryland and was taught a little about reading and writing from the wife of one of his masters. He taught himself the rest, escaped to the north, and worked in Boston and New York. He eventually became a well-known antislavery orator in the north and in England (even while remaining a fugitive slave).

Douglass worked closely with William Lloyd Garrison in Rochester, NY, one of the hearts of the abolition movement, on a newspaper called The North Star. Eventually Douglass and Garrison had a falling out, but Douglass also famously worked with the women's rights movement, which paralleled the abolitionist movement in some ways.

Douglass was an incredible man, and his autobiography reads like someone sitting in a room telling you a story. It's an amazing tale and a true page-turner. I highly recommend it.

P.S. Yes, he does look like a lion! ;)

Glimfeather
October 26th, 2007, 03:35 PM
Yes, you should definitely check out his most famous work, "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave."

Douglass was an incredible man, and his autobiography reads like someone sitting in a room telling you a story. It's an amazing tale and a true page-turner. I highly recommend it.



<Brimming with eagerness, Glimfeather stumbles under the teetering load of GWC-recommended books.>

At least I have something to keep me occupied till April. ;)